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Raylo

Brand Identity, Digital Design

A new visual identity for a start-up with a mission to make mobile simple, smart and more sustainable.

Raylo offers its customers a subscription model to access the latest iPhone. By adopting the idea that you don’t need to own the hardware to have a great experience, Raylo makes upgrading your mobile phone less wasteful and is a more cost-effective alternative to the overpriced bundle deals currently offered by big phone networks.

Subscribers receive a fully-insured, SIM-free device, equipped with a screen protector and a fully compostable Pela case; made from plants, not plastic. Once the two-year membership is up, subscribers return the phone and receive the latest model. In embracing this contemporary approach to ownership, old phones no longer sit unused in drawers.

The visual identity is built on the theme of ownership being a fluid continuum, with handsets changing hands and of customers being in control. A simple motif of a ‘switch’ is at the heart of the system, giving simple icons and the UI a unique feel, while also becoming a dynamic and fluid, two-colour pattern.

The pattern can be adapted for various applications. For example, it appears on merchandise in a simple and pared back way, while on the packaging box and loader within the app, it’s more expressive and daring.

The simple wordmark reflects the ‘switch’ idea, as a square removed in the stem of the ‘R’, appears at the end of the logo as a full stop.

Playful tones of soft pink and pop blue add a human and fun feel to the more tech charcoal. These colours are on show throughout all aspects of the identity – across packaging, marketing collateral, thank you card, website and phone case, as well as other merchandise.

FK Grotesk is used for its typographic curves, which become pixelated on screen. In tweaking the uppercase ‘Y’ by swapping it for the lowercase ‘y’ glyph, we have FK Grotesk Raylo, so the font fits more seamlessly with the wordmark.

Client
Raylo
Sector
Technology
Discipline
Brand Identity
Digital Design
Office
London
Partners
Jody Hudson-Powell
Luke Powell
Project team
Margherita Papini
Laura Chan
Ali Raybould
Albert Sanjuán
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